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in massachusetts and the same people who were the architects of the affordable care act, so to say that they were different plans is ridiculous. >> dave, you've heard republicans have been very critical here of obama care specifically the individual mandate. and mitt romney did make a comment on that. take a listen. >> you say it should only be done at the state level, but here's what he said in 2007 about the idea of the thmandate. >> i think you'll find when it's all said and done after all the states that are the laboratories of democracy get their chance to try their own plans, that those who follow the path that we pursued will find it's the best path and we'll end up with a nation that has taken a mandate approach. >> so what is your thought here? what is done on the state level, is it reasonable for think it can be done on the national level? >> i'll say something very rare. i think romney is being consistent. actually is consistent to say he wants a state plan being he wants the federal government to stay out of it. it might irritate democrats to see him again, but he is making a correct
from massachusetts, mr. mcgovern, pending which i yield myself such time as i may consume. during consideration of this resolution, all time yielded is for the purpose of debate only. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. burgess: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. burgess: mr. speaker, house resolution 413 provides for consideration of h.r. 3350, the keep your plan act of 2013. the rule provides for one hour of debate controlled by the committee on energy and commerce equally divided between the majority and minority. because the bill addresses a targeted emergency situation caused by the lack of foresight in the affordable care act, namely the cancellation of millions of existing health insurance plans despite repeated promises to the contrary, because of that, the rule makes no amendments in order. however, the minority is afforded the customary opportunity to offer one motion to recommit should they so choose. this is a fair
in 1838 that angelina grimke was speaking to the massachusetts state legislature, against slavery and for a woman's right to vote, only a mile away in the north end, john simmons was actively growing his tailoring business, employing many women here in boston and in the countryside around the city. having observed that most of his customers fell into standard sizes, he departed from custom tailoring and innovated the retail industry by creating a man's off the rack suit. at the end of the civil war, john simmons had become the largest clothing manufacturer in the united states. at the time of his death in 1870, his will records his intention for his great wealth. to found and endow an institution to be called simmons female college for the purpose of teaching branches of art, science, and industry, this calculated to enable the scholars to acquire an independent likelihood. recognizing the importance of being able to move beyond the menial work and menial wages to which most women of the day were hasect, john simmons enabled generations and him and to be empowered. those of us who
body. she spoke before the masses uses state legislator -- the massachusetts state legislature. coming up, this is just over two hours. [applause] >> welcome, everyone. moderatoryour evening . we are here tonight to explore how women become political. we will look at the past and the future,and consider the too. there will be some remarks and the panel of discussion you'd regretfully, senator elizabeth warren is not able to join us because she needs to be in washington. someone has to work. she is there to work in the senate. [applause] has made a short video for us that we will share place of the remarks she would have given. during the evening, we invite you to tweak and send your questions in via twitter at -- to tweet and send your questions in via twitter at #womenpoli2013. also, silence your cell phones right now. everybody moving to silence the cell phones? good. and for those who could not attend tonight, the good news is that the event is being taped by the grimke event committee for anding via the website by c-span for viewing later on this fall. this event has come together
with massachusetts officials and mr. sullivan. we understand the humility. and i yield my time to the gentleman from virginia, mr. connolly. . . mr. connolly: i thank my colleague. i assure him it bonet be -- it won't be lengthy. when i first heard that barry sullivan was retiring, my reaction was, say it ain't so. i've been in this body for five years and one of the first people i met in orientation was barry sullivan. and as a son of boston, myself, as an irish catholic myself, as somebody whose family vacations where cod periodically, barry also vacations, i felt i was at home. i felt that there was a human face to this institution. who cared about it passionately, who had ties to tip o'neill and joe mogley, two great heros in my family's household in bostonment and i think barry has provided incredible service to the people's body, to this house, and has tried to ease stress, has tried to make our lives more comfortable. i cannot imagine what we're all going to do when our pager goes off and we don't hear that boston sta catow, you know, there will be four votes. this is the last series of the
of the economy, an experimental local currency in massachusetts, could it be going global? >>> are scientists why unearth a newly discovered dinosaur they call, the king of gore. we are beginning to get details from the philippines after a direct mit from one of the most powerful storms every recorded. huge waves crashed ashore, as supertyphoon haiyan made landfall. the are island of lehte is wrecked. spotty communication, filipino authorities credit report at least expwhrp 110 people are debt in tekloban. two c-140 cargo planes have left there and they are trying clear the runway. >> goa what's the lateliest? >> well, we understand that government aircraft have now been able to land in lehta which is believed to be the worst affected island. and initial reports are saying that there are innewer rabble can casualties on leyte many coavment villages was given fair warning that there somewhere would be a storm surge by it, we understand if waves as high as 15 feet also crashed on the island because it was supposed to be a tropical storm. there is only so much you can do to prepare for the strength
massachusetts, mr. lynch, is recognized. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i want to thank the members of the panel for coming forward and their willingness to help the committee with its work. i do want to say this at the outset, that my experience in massachusetts with the massachusetts health care, the so-called romney care, that was a precursor to this in many ways, i'm speaking of the affordable care act, also rolled out very, very, very slowly. that's my experience, being on the ground in massachusetts, when that plan went forward. so it was very slow in ramping up. of course, it didn't have the -- you know, the urgency of this program. it was sort of planned that way. and i also remember the medicare part "d" act which was a republican initiative also rolled out extremely slowly. and i know a lot of my seniors, i had to do 16 town halls around my district to try to tamp down the backlash because of the slowness of how that was ramped up. so this is not -- this experience is not out of line with those other two programs. and so i just wanted to make that note. i have had a chance to go out an
1905.on v. massachusetts, there was a pastor in cambridge who refuse to get vaccinated for smallpox. said it was a religious objection. the supreme court said, too bad. tough luck. the bottom line is there is a point at which every person responsibility issue becomes a public health one. and the question is -- where is the line and what are the legal doctrines that govern the crossing over of that line? i would submit to you that we have surpassed that for this problem. yet we have not enacted any societal interventions that are meaningful to try to fix it. that is what needs to change. >> thank you, dr. lustig. i was wondering if you could speak little bit to other disease in addition to obesity, such as autoimmune disease. >> autoimmune disease is a grab bag. this is being televised, taped. and i am about the science. andscience on auto immune disease is very much an open question. to tella little loaathe you how all of this might tie into autoimmune disease, other than to say that people are working on it. i am very interested, but i am not willing to go public on it. not until
of massachusetts and that was changed as a national symbol. kennedy made it romantic and republicans were able to reduce it to harvard, symbolic out of the mainstream, too smart for prime time sort of thing. we both know boston is far more than harvard. scott brown is very much massachusetts just as elizabeth warren is. and i can see a guy like chris christie coming out of somewhere, southy or some other area in the greater boston area, like massachusetts is so much more than we were tagged dukakis. >> that gets to -- the reason i like michael dukakis, if somebody is wondering, why does he care about dukakis 25 years later? i think he gets one of the worst raps and unfair raps of any sort of modern major political figure. part of what you're saying about massachusetts is this idea of him being the harvard brookline tech no craft, volvo, wine and cheese, that's the label -- this image that stuck around him. i think it's tremendously unfair. not who he is. if you look at his rise in massachusetts, he appealed to the first generation and second generation pride, families off the boat struggling t
always assumed that, based on massachusetts' experience, the initial sign up will be very slow. and in fact, no payments have to be made until december 15 for coverage on january 1. so, while we don't like the problems we had in october and fixing it in november, we do not think it will impact the timeline because we have a six- month enrollment, so we still have four months left and individuals can apply up until march. >> thank you. thank you, mr. chairman. >> now to senator robert. -- senator roberts. senator robert? >> thank you, mr. chairman. 'm going to focus, if i can, on the concerns raised by senator isakson, alexander, and the chairman, on security and privacy. we have a law, the federal information security management .ct, his mother --fisma everything has to have an acronym. it requires each agency to a point a chief security officer to ensure americans private financial and identifying information is protected. and that is a big issue. secretary civilians revealed last week exchanges operating on temporary authority to operate. there is a 2012 12 memo from zyonts,
is under way this morning this hour for a massachusetts teen accused of killing a teacher, a grand jury indicted 14-year-old philip c s chisholm yesterday. ical lecnn has been covering th story from the beginning and pamela brown is covering the case. >> you're right christine and john. i was in danvers right after this teacher was murdered and it really stunned the community and now we're learning more horrific details in the story. we have obtained the murder indictment, we obtained that yesterday for 14-year-old philip chisholm. he'll be tried as an adult in superior court for that charge and we're also learning he faces two additional charges for aggravated rape and armed robbery. as of now he's charged as a youthful offender for those. the armed robbery indictment alleges that chisholm armed with a box cutter robbed her of her credit cards, cash and underwear. he sexually assaulted her with an object, this is new information we're learning and this story from the beginning has been so devastating, so horrific, and it's just -- >> it's a teacher that everyone really loved and a com
knows something about obama care from being from massachusetts. any other reasons? >> maybe because he's built businesses, corporations that hire tens of thousands of americans. but, you know, nancy passed the bill away from the fog of washington. pelosi doesn't take into account what's really going on around the country. she's going to go out and simply make the talking point. this is what the president wants her to do. this is what she's doing. so frankly just dismiss her. let's go back to what is happening just like the interview you just had. the interview you had was one on the numbers. when they talked about 5% of the population over 15 million people. if they are not served by obama care like promised, that's like 15 million people not served. >> let's go back to what romney said. was it too strong for him to say it's rotten, the rest of the three years of president obama? >> remains to be seen. i would say he's not been right about a lot of things. we'll leave it at that. the one thing he was not accurate about is where he said massachusetts works because it's a state plan. gov
in watertown, massachusetts right now. correspondence ed lavandera is standing by as is our own john king. give us a quick thought, gerald. let's start with you. this is the hour testifies shot exactly 50 years ago today. >> wolf every minute that pas as we're talking right now, there is something taking place 50 years ago in the setup to the assassination. just a few minutes ago, three of oswald's coworkers in the texas school book depository decided to go downstairs for lunch. one of them said are you coming along to him? he said no, send the elevator back up and they went down. then the next few minutes as the president's coming down main street, it's lee harvey oswald taking some boxes and starting to form the sniper's nest that police will find after the assassination. so the leadup to 12:30 when the president is killed is filled with the time for the preparation, for the killing by oswald. we're passing those every moment as we're speaking right now. >> david kaiser, give me a quick thought as begin our special coverage this hour. you spent a lot of time academiciancally studying this mom
accused of killing a popular teacher in massachusetts is also charged with raping her now. we are learning a lot more from documents that the court has now released today. police say they found a note alongside this young teacher's body. we'll tell you what it said. you've known? we gave people a sticker and had them show us. we learned a lot of us have known someone who's lived well into their 90s. and that's a great thing. but even though we're living longer, one thing that hasn't changed much is the official retirement age. ♪ the question is how do you make sure you have the money you need to enjoy all of these years. ♪ >> virginia state senator creigh deeds left the hospital three days after surviving a stabbing a parentally at the hands o of his son, and soon after he left the hospital he tweeted, i am alive so i must live. some wounds won't heal. your prayers and friendship are important to me. on tuesday, investigators say senator deeds got into some sort of altercation with his 24-year-old son, gus deeds. police say the son apparently stabbed his father several times and then s
, the first woman senator from massachusetts in the u.s. senate. let's have a little applause right there. [applause] in addition, we have a number of other important female elected officials some of whom are with us tonight. we're honored to have present as well, steve grossman, treasurer of the commonwealth. and would other male elected officials stand who are here tonight in support of the cause of women in politics? [applause] tonight's event was sparked by a milestone in women's political activism 175 years ago right here in boston. angelina grimke, a white southerner from charleston, south carolina, became the first american woman to address the legislative body. tonight, we are honored to have her great-great-grandson with us. please give him applause. [applause] angelina grimke's purpose in addressing the legislative body was to present petitions bearing the signatures of 20,000 massachusetts women, black and white, to a joint committee of the general court. the petitioners sought to have congress end slavery in the district of columbia. before grimke spoke about the issue of slav
officers. and almost immediately the governor of massachusetts began recruiting free blacks. fly were distributed near and far from massachusetts to connecticut and pennsylvania, ohio, other northern states and even to canada. working to fill a first of 1,000 recruiters included prominent black frederick douglass and william henry johnson. the 45th massachusetts volunteer was the first northern black to be organized and among the recruit were two of frederick douglass' sons. the white officers were hand picked by the governor himself. subsequently, 23-year-old robert shaw became the chosen officer to lead the regular men had such great importance first because unlike the other black regularmen already organized in the south, it was composed of free black men. would rest on the conduct of the 45th massachusetts battle when the nay sayers were insisting blacks would not, could not fight. having no clue about the fire in their soul ready to ignite. frederick douglass. the 54th massachusetts four performed valiantly. they. they were honor recipient served. it was sergeant william consider
thought. in fact, when scott brown won that seat in massachusetts, you voted so quickly to ensure that not one republican will have input in the senate. and you now you complain about republicans being part of the fix. you didn't care what we had to say during the time. >> this is not true. >> nancy pelosi made it clear. you'll have to read the bill when it's passed. because you didn't want to take the time to listen to republican ideas to get republican input and now you want to blame us. that's not how it works. >> the secret is this whole thing was bit on conservative republican ideas in the first place that you all cut and ran from because this president is the one who promoted it. >> zero votes. zero republican votes because you didn't want to work with us. you didn't care about our ideas. and now you want to blame us. it doesn't work that way. >> that's just not how it happened. >> when we passed part "d" and that's a great success. >> guys, we've got to leave it there. mo from the dnc, sean from the rnc, this was fun. let's do it again. >> thanks for having us. >> thanks. >
under the health care reform law that massachusetts enacted in 2006 under governor romney. >> we can reasonably expect the numbers will grow substantially over the next five months as they did in massachusetts which enrolled only .3%. or 123 people in its first month. we know from experience in the bay state that people tend to research and kid theconsider th options talk things over with their families before making a purchase. >> joining me now, from "the washington post," and professor of economics at mit who worked on the massachusetts health care reform law and -- the affordable care act. okay, professor, it is up to you to tell us how -- the affordable care act is doing, compared to the early days of the massachusetts law. >> the big issue, it is too early to make a strong conclusion. the bottom line is people don't sign up until they have to. >> we are doing better than massachusetts. as secretary sebelius said .3% in massachusetts. 1 1/2% of the federal level. goal of 7 million. that is not a relevant comparison. relevant comparison happen in march. we need new focus on not t
. it's got to be better. and it will be. take a look at that experience in massachusetts. the senator from california talked about that earlier. during the first month of enrollment in massachusetts, 123 people signed up. in the first 30 days. by the end of the year, though, 36,000 had signed up. the number of uninsured young people went from 25% to 10% within three years. massachusetts today, because of the leadership of governor mitt romney and the cooperation of the democratic legislature in that state, has nearly universal health insurance coverage. however the roll-out wasn't without some problems, just as ours s. thours is. the current governor said there were a series of web site problems. he also said the web site was a work in progress for the first few years. there were outages during peak times and problems searching for providers. i recently met with a doctor from boston. he's one of the best. he said, people in massachusetts can't remember what it was like before. they can't remember what it was like before people had health insurance. this doctor is an oncologist. he dea
predictions about healthcare reform in massachusetts never came true. they are the same arguments that you're hearing now. >> reporter: as if the week went bad enough revelations of secret spying tactics are creating an uproar here and abroad. tureous though the nsa tracked the conversations of millions of citizens and some leaders. german chancellor angela merkel had her phone tapped as far back as 2002. obama personally apologized to merkel, but there are still questions about whether he knew about the eavesdropping. >> welcome to the white house. >> reporter: when things go wrong president obama often grabs hold of the situation and works to correct it in a big public way. >> nobody is matter than me about the fact that the website is not working as well as it should, which means it's going to get fixed. >> reporter: but this week he seemed overshadowed by the generals and leaders in his cabinet who instead took the heat. >> hold me accountable for the debacle. i'm responsible. >> reporter: kathleen is h sebes endured nearly four house of questions in the white house. >> nothing that ha
of the government plan with a similar law that he signed into law as governor of massachusetts. >> in massachusetts we phased in the requirements so that there was a slow roll out. that way you could test the systems as you went along to make sure there wasn't glitches. and the most important lesson that i think the president failed to learn you have to tell the american people the truth. when he told the american people that you could keep your health insurance if you wanted to keep that plan, period. he said that time and again, he wasn't telling the truth. >> romney went on to say the economy has stalled, and the u.s. has lost international credibility since president obama was re-elected. >>> the tea party movement has members of the g.o.p. now taking sides. we go to alabama where a special election shows the true republican divide. >> as the sun sets on the water that defines mobile, alabama, they get to work trying to win the soul of the republican party. >> i've been a fan of dee young's for a long, long time. >> he calls himself a true believer, of the conservative faction, the tea party. >
is now back on the job serving and protecting the people of springfield, massachusetts. i'm also pleased to say nevada law also includes robust protections against this type of discrimination. officer carney testified before the house of representatives in 2007 and shared his story. mr. president, this is what he said: "i'm god cop. i've lost two and a half years of employment, fighting to get that job back because i'm gay. i never would have been able to do that had i not lived in massachusetts or in one of the handful of other states that protect employees from discrimination. sadly you mr. president, not everyone is able to fight back like officer carney. in 33 states, lesbian, gay yo cn be fired or harassed just for being who they are. sam hall was terrorized by his coworkers for seven years because he was gay. mr. hall just wanted to make a living. but supervisors told him he would have to endure the persecution if he wanted to keep his job. west virginia is one of 33 states with no protections against this type of discrimination. that's why, mr. president, i so admire joe manchin f
that because we know the product is good. senator boxer talked about the massachusetts experience in which during the first month of their enrollment for the massachusetts exchange, only .3 #% of the total signed up during that month. why? because people take time. this is not animal easy decision to sign up for health care. in connecticut where we have an exchang that's up and running, a wbsz thabs working, the first month, know our number? it was not.# # #%, but enrolled 10% of the expected total in the first 30 days, and here's what people say about their experience with connecticut's exchange. one said, this is a great resource for cops residents to apply for health coverage, thanks to the health care law. another said, i chose access health because i've been denied in the past by other carriers. before this law changed. another said, thank you so much for this health care law. i have not been insured in a decade. i am so, so, so thankful. another said, thank you for this program. i lost my job a year ago and couldn't find anything that i could afford in health coverage before this law
-- i don't know of a site, massachusetts when they started their site, had 123 people that signed up in the first month. it's now been an enormous success, if you had to vote today on massachusetts, i dare say 90% of the people would say, let's keep it, well, that over time had the same, not the same degree of glitches, but the same kind we're experiencing at the national site. >> different scale? >> exactly. there are going to be things that have to be addressed. some of it was avoidable and it's unfortunate we didn't catch this earlier and didn't address it earlier. that doesn't deny what our country recognizes as such an imperative. all of those who oppose, and criticize and all of those who really find fault are really not providing the kind of opportunities for alternatives. i mean, what is it we do if we don't do this what solutions are there that might provide a better solution than what we're looking at today. none of the critics i've seen have really been forthcoming in that regard. that's something i think american people ought to be asking. >> the exchanges where the state
, but when i lived in massachusetts, where i live, i was close to boston. i had such a great time in boston but i did not like massachusetts so much because it was cold, the culture was foreign to me. when i came to san francisco, the first time i came, there was a rainbow over the bay and there was something calling me. i was 20 at the time. i knew that this was a place i needed to live. the history here, you can see it in terms of buildings, you know the history from, labor history, hit the history, history of what happened in 1978 with milk, mosconi. but i wanted to be a part of its. >> what got you involved in politics? >> i had been involved in politics for decades. i was doing work around central america, supporting people in central america, protecting against u.s. imperialism, and their right to live. i was doing a lot of work on campus in college. head of work against apartheid. i was involved in a lot of the efforts to push back on efforts to remove affirmative action, prop 209, all kinds of work around ballot measures that were tough, big ideas, like single payer, but i never got
francisco and chicago and massachusetts and maine main. would you indeed reduce our utilization of other programs. massachusetts is a great example they quantifyed the individual that go into housing we actually saw a close to $6,500 reduction in medicaid costs. and most of the other studies we've seen rouksz in costs but we didn't see this real continual interaction of housing and health care pr we saw the health care providers getting into the housing and wait we didn't see the person go into the hospital but we didn't see community say health care you have 80 come to the table and housing you have to come to the table and let's work together and see the results. i'm proud to say that to san francisco is one of our projects we're looking at that what would happen if we targeted 14 of those around the country there's got to be an intellectual connection between housing and health care. so we have 4 community the state of connecticut and washington here in san francisco and also los angeles. you'll be surprised to know we're learning different things in connecticut for over the years i'v
for massachusetts. here's mitt romney's response. quote. nothing has changed my view that a plan crafted to fit the unique circumstances of a single state should not be grafted on to the entire country. health reform is best crafted by state with bipartisan support and input from its employers as we did without raising taxes and by carefully phasing it in to avoid the type of disruption we are seeing nationally, unquote. romney, by the way, was not invited to attend the president's annual hall speech. defending obama care. >> question, who aside from mitt romney sees the current chaos as disruptive? >> i think romney was right on the mark there. when you have a bipartisan, when the governor is helping you out to implement the program and the government is part of the program, it works. the state that is receptive to government in healthcare. when you go to mississippi, of course, they will do everything to throw monkey wrenches into the process who don't want to implement it. this is his statement. goes directly with obama is saying. wanting the thing to work and not wanting to work. >> ther
rally up in massachusetts, the state made famous for his so-called romney care which was used as a blueprint to the affordable care act of the president's. the president is at war with republican who is have made it their sole mission these days and years to destroy the health care law. while the aca has certainly seen its share of glitches or problems, the gop has gone to great lengths to magnify and in many cases distort the issues. look at the latest headline in today's los angeles times. quote, another obama care horror story debunked. gwen moore a democrat from washington and jonathan gruber an m.i.t. professor in economics. he also served as an adviser to the white house and to congress on the president's health care plan. congresswoman, i want to start with you. i think somebody from mars would watch the congress these days and say what are those people so angry about? fighting like mad from the republican side with all this anguish and frightening anger. and i get the feeling it's not about whether the program is working or not. what they are angry about the democrats
to the first weeks of romney care in massachusetts. >> reporter: now we know the federal healthcare website healthcare.gov . is sick, we know that. we've been reporting that for weeks. now let's go back to when it was launched. we're now getting an indication of how sick it actually was when it was first launched. this site is responsible for attracting people from 36 states to buy healthcare under the president's new law. at the end of the first day just six people we are now told had signed up for health air. just six. at the end of the afternoon on the second day which was october 2nd that number had risen to 100, and only 248 people had signed up by the end of the second day. this, according to the house of oversight of government reform committee who just released these figures. this is bad news for the government because they said b by 2014 they reckon to have 7 million people signed up. clearly there is a long way to go. there is precedence for this. do you remember mitt romney who ran against the president in 2012, well, romney cares will had a weak start. only 123 people had signed
in massachusetts and it achieved full lift off here in san francisco but i want to thank the american foundation for equal rights and the plaintiff's. i don't know is cleaving jones here. clech representing the american foundation of equal rights chad griffin we all worked together and thanks so much for everything you did. we couldn't have achieved the success here today without you. i'd like to ask terry stuart worked day and night i want to give them a chance to talk about. thank you >> thank you (clapping). >> i never see me at the poumd without the opinion in my hand. i want to add we're excited about getting marriage equality back it upholds this supreme court decision but you know there's a doma case and a lot of people fought about it but when we work together great things happen and in the doma case the court expressed a equal protection. so i'm really great deal of to the people who work so hard on the doma case and the people who were the plaintiffs in the cases and await us both working together we have this two part victory so we should celebrate both. thank you (clapping) >> we
is on the right side of your screen. the former massachusetts governor and 2012 presidential nominee accused president obama of selling affordable care act to the american people as a lie. >> and the centerpiece of obama care over the last several years saying time and time again, fundamental to his plan was the right to keep their own insurance plan, and he knew that was not the case. >> he criticized the sloppy rollout of the exchanges online, and rejected the president's praise of the health care reform law, and he said he passed a similar one in massachusetts. >> in massachusetts we phased in the requirements so that there was a slow rollout, and that way you can test the systems as you went along to make sure there would not be glitches and perhaps the most important lesson the president, i think, failed to learn was, you have to tell the american people the truth. >> meanwhile, senior white house correspondent said the president did keep his white house and pointed the finger at insurance companies. >> if the president didn't intend to keep his promise, why would he go out of his way t
of harvard, governor of massachusetts, united states senator. yes, and ambassador to england and secretary of state. lincoln taught himself. >> darn poor teacher, i'd say. >> i never said links con is a great man. maybe he isn't. but he's come a long way by the light of a pine knot with a shingle for a blackboard, charcoal for a pencil and a jack knife for an eraser. he taught himself to read and write and figure. and now he's president. >> but he won't be long. he's dead as a cock in a pit. thad stevens, republican foreleader in congress when advised of the president's decision to speak at gettysburg cemetery said the dead is going to eulogize the dead. >> that's it. the dead go to bury the dead. >> here's phil now. >> slower than mow lass ses. >> let me have "the new york times." >> that's phil still down at the depot this morning getting the train back to washington. he was there. said it wasn't much of a speech. >> says here exactly what happened. all it says is, president lincoln made a few remarks upon the occasion. >> everett, phil says, spoke longer than 57 minutes. one of the grea
those created in massachusetts under then governor mitt romney. john kingsville who ran the program for massachusetts. vewashington journal" li every morning at 7:00 eastern. >> there are some serious dollars in women's studies. most departments include their ideological, academic courses. ideologically fervent to statistically challenged hard- liners set the tone. all that i have ever seen. a change of plans. conservative women's, moderate women, libertarian women, religious women left out. >> late century contentment is him -- feminism have led critics to label her as antifeminist. sunday, december first, your questions for the author. 54 three hours beginning at noon eastern. looking ahead to the new year, join mark levin january 5. in-depth, the first sunday of every month on c-span2. >> every weekend since 1998, book to be has brought you the -- non--fiction authors. > the fact that such women exist, it is not the way i would do it. i took 20 of maternity leave. i feel like that is the growing number -- that is the kind of woman that there can be space for. the fact that there
, and we will look at the desert bus for hope. >> and football season canceled in massachusetts. michael eaves explains why in sports ahead onal jazeera america. seriously wrong... >> there's been acrimony... >> the conservative ideal... >> it's an urgent need... and a host willing to ask the tough questions >> how do you explain it to yourself? and you'll get... the inside story ray suarez hosts inside story next only on al jazeera america >> when was the last time your road trip took you from tucson to las vegas. it's an eight hour journey and one that is virtual. stay with me here. but it raises real money for some really special kids. so here to tell us all about the desert bus and it's mission is alan schafler in british columbia. it's all yours. >> reporter: tony, here we go. we're talking about the desert bus for hope. we'll pan to the right. and show you who is driving right now. and there is the screen from the desert bus co-opted by a comedy troupe and their extended family and friends to create a huge fundraiser a wildly pop lay event reaching all over the world. they turned a
. >> raising kids. >>> a massachusetts woman on a noigs protect our four legged friends. her campaign to keep the k-9 officers safe and sound. >>> a dog, a blind man and a flight attendant and the passenger revolt they triggered that actually kept the flight on the ground. that story is coming up on "world news now." >> announcer: "world news >>> we all know heros come in different shapes and sizes, and often four feet. >> one animal lover in massachusetts is trying to change it one dog at a time. here's abc's gio benitez. >> they are heros on the front line, the first on the scene. the most dangerous confrontations. >> saint paul police k-9 is dead. >> the k-9 officer. >> shot and killed the dog. >> just last month t k-9 from sacramento county shot in the chest while chasing a robbery suspect. he survived. it's a headline that officer ed meyers hears all too often. >> my partner looks out for me. i look out for my partner. >> reporter: partners that do their job without a crucial life-saving tool, a bulletproof vest. that's where sandy mar sell comes in. custom-fitted k-9 vests cost $950. to
to cart those providers out if they're too unaffordable. the state of massachusetts is good to look at. the agency who buys for state employees are less expensive because they use an alternative network which means the lower networks in the market. as network design changes occur, i think we can see things really change a lot as more competition gets introduced that way. >> last question and i should have asked this of professor midic, we think about a state exchange here in california, what do you think the impact is going to be in terms of our topic about costs and i think as we went through the cpmc discussions, the only thing we agree on is everyone doesn't know what's going to happen. what do you think about it? >> in california you have a proactive value purchaser of health care. it can have a significant impact on in this market in terms of what it's going to demand of the participating health plan and the prices they have and the information they provide to their enrolled patients around helping and supporting them to make more economical decisions. the only way they're goin
. there was 1955 speech at the assumption college in my hometown of massachusetts, where he said about the cold war that i believe religion itself is at the root of the struggle and not in terms of the physical organizations or christianity versus those of atheism, but in terms of good versus evil and right versus wrong. and in his remarks during the campaign at the tabernacle in salt lake city, where he said the enemy is a communist system itself, insatiable and unceasing in its drive for world domination, it is also a struggle for supremacy between conflicting nato ologies, freedom under god versus godless turning. in kennedy's famous lines in the inaugural address, the same revolutionary beliefs for which we are still at issue around the globe. coming not from the generosity of the state, but from the hand of god. we shall pay any price and bear any burden and meet any hardship and support any friends and oppose any foe to assure the survival and success of liberty. and ask not what your country can do for you, but ask what you can do for your country. and in december 1962 he said it are two cho
-- resident of massachusetts general. then as a speechwriter for vice president mondale for their presidential campaign then when he came to the new republic in 1981. that was the golden age. and what was interesting is of group of people with a group of ideas that frequently fought over them but at any rate charles won the national award at coveted prize then when it to go to "the washington post" and since it has continued to write for the "washington post" as it is an inspiring columnist you write one column per week it you cannot do more than that but it called the most powerful force kahane of american kazoo for to miss them. calling him the most important conservative columnist. you can hear him tonight to hear questions from the floor so save up your questions you are in for a real treat. mr. krauthammer. [applause] >> 84 being here mr. president and mrs. bush. there are nice introductions and there are kind introductions that lists your achievements transcribe and notarize to end said your mother a copy. to state -- despite your pitch reduction you included things that i now have to ex
of banks for the commonwealth of massachusetts. it is my pleasure to testify before you today on be-half behalf of the conference of ou state supervisor.hold i thank you forin holding this n hearing today to address the risks and benefits of virtual currency. theri risks of virtual currency include consumer protection, payment systems, national ity, m security, money laundering, and other illicit activities. the potential benefits are also differ.fits are speed and efficiency, lower transaction costs, and providin an outlet for the unbanked and underbanked. with these evolving payment technologies states are exploring the connection between existing money transmitter regulation and virtual currencies. state regulators have long supervised money transmitters to protect consumers and preserve national security and lawnete enforcement interests. state regulators are talking with industry and other regulators about evolving methods of moving funds. this includes virtual currencies, prepaid cards, vir mobile services, andtu peer to pier transactions. state regulators believe that ae ope
.cotney mr. cotney is an active contributor to consumer protection efforts both in massachusetts and nationally. in 2013 he was elected as vice chairman of the board of directors of the conference of state bank supervisors whose behalf he testifies here today. mrs., mr. cotney. miss shasky-cavalry, if you could start. >> chairman warner and merkley, rafrking members kirk and heller and members of the subcommittee. i'm jennifer s hachlt sky calvery, the director of the financial crimes enforcement network. i'm pleased to be here to i'm he discuss the work we're doing at finsen to prevent illicit actors from exploiting the u.s. financial system as technological advances such as g virtual currency create new ways to move money. recognizing the potential for abuse of emerging new payment a methods anymd understanding tha anti-money laundering l protections must keep pace with these advancements, finsen begag working with our partners several years ago to study the issue. here's what we learned.le illicit actors might decide to use virtual currency for many of the same reasons as le
enrollment period. and just in terms of the massachusetts experience, young adults have waited somewhat longer but the uninsured rates among young adults is 21% in the year prior to the passage of the law in massachusetts. that rate dropped to 8% in the after. i think it does, the experience, the survey research that we've done, the experience in massachusetts does suggest young adults will come into the market places, the numbers will help do what we're hoping they would do not only helping them but also stabilizing the market. spent so, we used all sorts of information sources to, on a weekly basis, hit the restart button. i had a meeting with my senior folks every week, looking back at what we know about enrollment, what we know about folks who were on the ground. so if we know that holding an event in the evening results in five people showing up versus launch, you get 50 people to show up, that's where our resources go. so we look at everything that's happened to not only the data we're seeing but also what we're hearing from our sisters. orienteering from brokers in community grou
hitler. it is really a very moderate that was first known as romney care. it was in massachusetts and his base class system to kind of regulate -- and is basically a system to kind of regulate. system forlic medicaid. a lot of democrats were very keen, it should come up again. there america clinton 50 years ago -- and they remembered clinton 15 years ago. with hillary clinton supported the policy that the barack obama adopted. that was all geared up. it was market friendly. the big difference between these two approaches are from the fact that health care passed with only democratic vote. where as cap the trade had to have some republicans to replace democrats. difference is 2009, affordable care act supported by a wide range coalition centered in health care for america now. they played a big role in putting together a coalition that outside the beltway. consumer groups and community groups and church groups. pushed. included in the legislation. after scott brown was elected in massachusetts, senator edward , the pressureded from the state at the local important aas very keeping democrat
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